University Exhibit

Booth Space: U11

Arab Academy for Science and Technology and Maritime Transport

Booth Space: U11


Spacecraft Platform For Nanosatellite Space Mission Applications<p>Abstract<br> Satellites are used for many things in our life, with a wide range of functionality such as communication, imaging, weather monitoring and so many other things. The problem is, these are big, expensive pieces of technology that require a lot of time, money and effort to develop. They can easily cost tens, or even hundreds of millions of dollars. In recent years, with the miniaturization of technology, some chose to circumvent this problem by building small, inexpensive nanosatellites that fly at much lower altitudes to replace the traditional ones. And instead of launching just one, you can easily launch tens of satellites, forming a grid covering the entire globe, for less than the cost of one big one. Our aim in this project is to build a small, inexpensive, real-time imaging satellite platform using off-the-shelf components to minimize cost, and also achieve most of the functionality done by much larger, hence much more expensive satellites. Our ATLAS-1 satellite is composed of different subsystems. First, our Communications Subsystem, we have designed an in-house communication board using commercial-off-the-shelf components where our approach is using an always-on, power-efficient radio transceiver operating on a frequency of 433MHz carrying commands and housekeeping data, and another, on-demand one operating on the 2.4GHz frequency carrying our imaging data, due to its much larger bandwidth and higher data rate. For their respective antennas, we are using in-house monopole and patch antennas, with a gain of 4dBi and 7dBi respectively. To handle power needs, our Electrical Power Subsystem combines 2600mAh of Li-Ion batteries connected to 7 panels of polycrystalline solar cells, each composed of 11 cells for a total output of 26.18Wh, and providing 5V of continuous output for the other subsystems. We will be carrying an imaging payload that consists of a second-generation,8-megapixel Raspberry Pi Camera Module, adapted to a 90mm Makustov-Cassegrain telescope from Celestron. All of these components are being controlled by our On-Board Computer, which is a Raspberry Pi Zero using a 1GHz ARM11 processor and 512MB of LPDDR2 memory, and operating with FreeRTOS, a real-time operating system made for performance-critical applications. This is all enclosed in a 3U CubeSat structure made of aluminum, measuring 30x10x10 cm and weighing in under 4Kg. This satellite offers a substantial value in terms of technical merit, as it largely undercuts current commercial market offerings in cost, and still offers much of the same functionality. It also has a huge educational merit, providing Egyptian university students with the specialized know-how necessary to build a fully-functioning satellite.

Booth Space: U7

Arizona State University

Booth Space: U7
Victor Hernandez
vaherna4@asu.edu

SWIMSat&#39;s LEO mission serves as a demonstration for future meteor detection by a constellation of observation satellites in GEO by taking images of a meteor payload reentering the upper Earth&#39;s atmosphere over the continental United States during nighttime from two vantage points: an observation satellite in LEO orbit and a ground telescope on Earth. Data from these observations will be analyzed to measure magnitude of brightness vs. velocity and altitude of a meteor reentry event as well as to characterize the drag profile of a reentry CubeSat in the upper atmosphere. In preparation for the future constellation mission, SWIMSat will prove the effectiveness of using an autonomous, real-time embedded algorithm for meteor impact detection, imaging, event discrimination, and selective downlink

Booth Space: U5

Brigham Young University

Booth Space: U5


spacecraft.byu.edu

The Passive Inspection CubeSats (PICs) mission consists of 2 - 1U CubeSats, each with 360° x 180° (spherical) camera systems. Immediately after separating from the launch vehicle, they bootup and begin imaging the launch vehicle to evaluate structural condition, validate state vector models, identify potential separation debris, and confirm separation.<p>Passive inspection CubeSats are the lowest risk solution to spacecraft visual inspection. Their spherical camera system enables them to maintain visual of their target while they are deployed with other CubeSats, without employing navigation or control systems. PICs will inspect the upper stage of Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne in flight later this year. PICs can be stowed on satellites, deep space probes, or manned vehicles for early diagnosis in the event of system malfunction.<p>PICs is BYU’s first mission.

Booth Space: U23-U24

California Polytechnic State University

Booth Space: U23-U24
Alicia Johnstone
aijohnst@calpoly.edu
http://www.cubesat.org

The CubeSat and PolySat programs started at Cal Poly in 1999 with the objective of providing students with the opportunity to develop and launch satellites in an academic lifetime. The CubeSat program is responsible for maintaining the CubeSat Design Specification (CDS), developing, maintaining and flying the Poly-Picosatellite Orbital Deployer (P-POD) and coordinating launches for CubeSats. The CubeSat Program has successfully tested and integrated 81 P-PODs for 21 missions on 12 different launch vehicles since 2003. The PolySat program, which incorporates a mix of undergraduate and graduate students, has developed and launched 9 different satellites, 5 of which are still on orbit. We are currently developing 6 different CubeSats. Cal Poly’s motto is “learn by doing,” and in that spirit, PolySat develops nearly all of our own subsystems in house. More information can be found at www.polysat.calpoly.edu.

Delft Technical University

Booth Space: U22

Delft Technical University

Booth Space: U22
Chris Verhoeven
c.j.m.verhoeven@tudelft.nl
http://www.tudelft.nl/en/

The mission of the TU Delft Space Institute is to bundle and create expertise on Space for local, regional and global impact on research, education and valorization. Our vision is to contribute to ground-breaking solutions to the Space sector to serve scientific, economic and societal needs.<br> To sense, to plan and to act: that is the essence of robotics. Space Robotics has enabled mankind to reach places where humans can’t go. The TU Delft Space Institute develops and flies state-of-the-art robotic systems. Mechatronics is an important research domain within Space Robotics. TU Delft has already succesfully demonstrated space mechatronics systems in the Delfi nano-satellite missions.

Booth Space: U26

Masdar Institute

Booth Space: U26


https://masdar.ac.ae/

A part of the newly-established Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Masdar Institute is a research-driven graduate-level institution. Masdar Institute has set up the Yahsat Space Laboratory in collaboration with Al Yah Satellite Communications Company (Yahsat) and Orbital ATK. The lab responds to the UAE leadership’s call to develop and advance technologies within the space sector and to make continuing strides toward the UAE’s advanced space ambitions. The new lab has been designed to provide students and faculty with the facilities required to construct, test and launch small satellites. The high-tech and specialized research facilities within the institute will also support the development of intellectual capital required to advance the space and aerospace sectors. Additionally, the lab will serve as a platform for future research in space technologies, allowing the UAE Space Agency to work with the Institute and other partners on collaborative projects that facilitate the advancement of the local space sector.

Booth Space: U17

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Booth Space: U17
Ashley Carlton
acarlton@mit.edu
http://starlab.mit.edu/

&#34;The Free-space Lasercom And Radiation Experiment (FLARE) is MIT&#39;s AFRL UNP NS-9 entry. A pair of identical 3U CubeSats will raise TRL for two technologies: (1) a full-duplex 1535/1565 nm crosslink laser communications transceiver, and (2) “Sparrow”, a miniaturized particle-discriminating nuclear spectrometer. To demonstrate the lasercom crosslink at &gt;20 Mbps with 200 mW transmit power, the co-deployed CubeSats use differential drag to increase their separation to 500 km. They achieve ~arcsec precision pointing by augmenting the control system with star trackers and crosslink beacons to drive MEMS fine steering mirrors. GPS receivers and RF coordination support orbit determination and drag management. Sparrow uses pulse shape discrimination to identify particle types and energies, valuable for science and documenting health of the lasercom components. Sparrow includes miniaturized plastic scintillators, solid-state detectors, a coincidence detector, and fast ADC readout. The flight design will be presented at the NS-9 PMR in August 2017.&#34;

Booth Space: U18

Michigan Technological University

Booth Space: U18


&#34;The Michigan Tech Aerospace Enterprise is a team of over 100 undergraduate students applying the fundamentals of Systems Engineering to design, build, and fly small satellites for agencies such as NASA and the Department of Defense.&#34;

Booth Space: U3

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Booth Space: U3
Shannah Withrow
snwmv8@mst.edu
http://web.mst.edu/~mrsat/

M-SAT was founded as a research team in 2002 by Dr. Pernicka along with three other faculty members who, with approximately 65 undergraduate and 10 graduate students, develop new technologies for smallsats. The team has participated in AFRL’s University Nanosatellite Program since 2005 and won the Nanosat 8 competition in January 2015 with a pair of smallsats (MR &amp; MRS SAT) that will conduct close proximity operations using a campus-designed stereoscopic imaging sensor. The team is also currently developing CubeSats for NASA’s Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (M^3) and AFRL’s Nanosat 9 Program (APEX).<p>APEX (Advanced Propulsion Experiment) is a 6U CubeSat with a campus-developed multi-mode micropropulsion system as its primary payload. Unique mission challenges include packaging the propulsion system and validating its performance on-orbit. Through this mission, M-SAT seeks to develop a versatile propulsion system that can be packaged in smallsats to expand future mission opportunities.

Booth Space: U13

Montana State University

Booth Space: U13
David Klumpar
klump@physics.montana.edu
https://ssel.montana.edu/

Working with government, academic, and industry partners, the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory at Montana State University is a leading developer of small space systems in an academic setting. Three goals of the program are to conduct fundamental research on the space environment, to evolve the capability of small space systems through flight development and application of innovative technologies, and to train the next generation of space scientists and space engineers. In the 16 years since its founding, the laboratory has participated in 21 space experiments, including International Space Station attached payloads, high altitude scientific sounding rocket investigations, and the design, development, test and launch of eight CubeSat-class satellites. Stop by our booth to talk to us about raising your technology to TRL9 or flying your mission in space.

Booth Space: U12

Morehead State University

Booth Space: U12
Benjamin Malphrus
b.malphrus@moreheadstate.edu
http://www.moreheadstate.edu/

The Space Science Center at Morehead State University focuses on the development and operation of small satellites. The Center provides TTandC services with the 21 meter Antenna at UHF, S-Band, X-Band, and Ku-bands. The Center provides spacecraft environmental testing services including: vibration analysis, T-Vac, EMI, and residual gas analysis. The Center’s staff and students have flown several space missions with partners including: KySat-2, CXBN, EduSat, UniSat-5, and T-LogQube, with others in development including CXBN-2 and Lunar IceCube (recently selected by NASA for the EM-1 mission). Morehead State University offers space-related academic programs including: a B.S. in Space Science, a B.S. in Astrophysics and a Master of Science in Space Systems Engineering. Courses are taught by outstanding faculty with industry experience in satellite systems design, defense electronics, and space operations. The faculty includes Professor Bob Twiggs, world-famous satellite engineer and inventor.

Booth Space: U10

Purdue University

Booth Space: U10
Alina Alexeenko
alexeenk@purdue.edu

Booth Space: U19

The State University of New York at Buffalo

Booth Space: U19
Andrew Harris
aharris12358@gmail.com

The University at Buffalo Nanosatellite Laboratory (UBNL) is a group of undergraduate and graduate students that are developing several cubesats. The Spectral Observation for Reflectivity Analysis (SORA) mission, one of the three satellites currently being developed by UBNL, is a 12U cubesat that will be&nbsp; using a spectrometer to observe resident space objects. These high spectral resolution observations of reflected light off space objects will enable characterization of the objects’ surface materials. .&nbsp; This will contribute to object characterization efforts in support of Space Situational Awareness. SORA is a participant in the University Nanosatellite Program, sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory.&nbsp; Other UBNL missions include the Glint Analyzing Data Observation Satellite (GLADOS), sponsored by the AFRL University Nanosat Program, and LinkSat, an RF noise characterization satellite sponsored by NASA’s Undergraduate Student Instrument Program.

Booth Space: U4

U.S. Naval Academy

Booth Space: U4
Jin Kang
kang@usna.edu
http://www.usna.edu/AeroDept/

The U.S. Naval Academy Satellite Lab in the Aerospace Department serves students, faculty and staff throughout the Academy, including students in the various Engineering and Weapons Departments. The main focus of the lab is to support small satellite development projects for both students and faculty. While the key objective of the program is education and training of the Midshipmen, the satellite lab at the USNA is also dedicated to conducting cutting-edge research in space system technology. One of the current USNA satellite projects, TugSat, is participating in the University Nanosatellite Program, NS-9. TugSat will demonstrate on-orbit operation of 3U + 3U CubeSat docking and undocking. The booth will have information on the key technologies and displays of the subsystem prototype demonstrations

Booth Space: U16

University of Arizona

Booth Space: U16


http://www.arizona.edu

Saberwing is a 6U CubeSat mission with the objective of exploring the moon while testing several new technologies. It is also a competitor for the NASA Lunar CubeQuest Challenge. Although low earth orbit has been revolutionized by nanosatellite design, deep space/ lunar exploration have varied little from multimillion dollar missions. In order to expand the scope of planetary exploration, we have designed an adaptable lunar nanosatellite which leverages several new technologies such as 3-D printed construction, a miniaturized optical communication package, and a high-efficiency ion thrusters. Saberwing will analyze the lunar surface with a thermal and multispectral imager, demonstrating planetary exploration from a nanosatellite/CubeSat platform. Currently planned for launch in the second half of 2018, success of Saberwing will show that interplanetary spaceflight can be conducted at a low cost and without the need of a primary interplanetary parent craft.

Booth Space: U9

University of Cincinnati

Booth Space: U9
Adam Herrmann
herrmaap@mail.uc.edu
uccubecats.org

The University of Cincinnati CubeCats is a student organization dedicated to the education of its members through the development of CubeSats. This year at SmallSat, the UC CubeCats will share their CubeCats Applied Training in Space Exploration (CATiSE) Program – a program designed to teach new members space mission engineering through the construction and launch of high altitude balloons. UC CubeCats will also share progress on their first CubeSat mission.

Booth Space: U14

University of Colorado Boulder

Booth Space: U14


http://www.colorado.edu/

MAXWELL is an experimental communications 6U CubeSat being developed by a team of graduate students at the University of Colorado at Boulder in conjunction with the 9th cycle of the Air Force’s University Nanosatellite Program.&nbsp; MAXWELL’s mission objective is to demonstrate high rate downlink and uplink capabilities in a small SWaP form factor from orbit.&nbsp; MAXWELL will demonstrate a high gain X-band reflectarray antenna; high rate data downlink and CDMA downlink at X-band; high rate data uplink and CDMA uplink at S-band.&nbsp; The MAXWELL project builds upon and has flight heritage from previous successful University of Colorado CubeSats including CU-E3, QB50, MinXSS, and CSSWE.

Booth Space: U25

University of Florida

Booth Space: U25
John Conklin
jwconklin@ufl.edu
http://www.mae.ufl.edu/

The University of Florida booth is here to showcase UF’s three laboratories focused on space systems technologies:<br> In the Precision Space Systems Lab we develop instruments and measurement techniques for gravitational science missions and future satellite navigation systems. On the technological side, our primary focus is on drag-free platforms, precision accelerometers and gyroscopes, and precision timing instruments for spacecraft. These technologies will improve our understanding of mass transport on the surface and in the interior of the Earth due to seasonal and secular effects, open up a new window to our universe through the first ever observation of low-frequency gravitational waves, test the limits of general relativity, and benefit future satellite navigation systems. In the area of space mission design, our goal is to reduce cost and increase robustness through the use of small satellites and disaggregated architectures.<br> The ADvanced Autonomous MUltiple Spacecraft laboratory (ADAMUS) specializes in hardware-in-the-loop ground experiments validating spacecraft relative motion guidance, navigation, and control, as well as proximity operations and maneuvers involving contact (on-orbit assembly, servicing, re-fueling). With its six-degrees-of-freedom air-bearing-based spacecraft simulator, the laboratory can reproduce the dynamics of free-flying spacecraft, creating a unique environment to consolidate algorithms to run on future satellites, as well as actual hardware subsystems. Contact dynamics models and tools for satellite servicing can also be tested at the ADAMUS facility. The ADAMUS laboratory bridges the gap between computer numerical simulations and actual orbital flight.<br> The Space Systems Research Group (SSG) is investigating issues related to multi-robot cooperation, specifically as it applies to spacecraft. Our more recent investigations are associated with the dynamics and controls of a flying formation of satellites which may be used for either remote sensing or deep space applications. We are also developing multi-agent robotic inspection systems for ground-based and on-orbit applications, a technology demonstration mission to test a boom and antenna spooling and deployment mechanism to support a matched very low frequency antenna receiver pair, and studying the impact patterns of space debris from modern satellites

Booth Space: U1-U2

University of Georgia

Booth Space: U1-U2
Graham Grable
ydfall10@uga.edu
http://www.smallsat.uga.edu/

The University of Georgia Small Satellite Research Laboratory (SSRL) was founded in 2016 as a result of funding for two Cubesat missions, MOCI and SPOC. The SSRL performs research into landscape-scale Structure from Motion with Cubesats, along with developing new hyperspectral payloads to study coastal ecosystem health. The SSRL is also active in community outreach, and runs the premier Cubesat podcast: The Downlink. The Mapping and Ocean Color Imager (MOCI) is part of the UNP-9 program from AFRL and will use an RGB camera to demonstrate that 3D terrain models can be developed from a single Cubesat using Structure from Motion. The SPectral and Ocean Color Satellite (SPOC Sat) will host a moderate resolution hyperspectral payload capable of gathering 60 bands of data between 400-850 nm. SPOC is expected to be deployed from the International Space Station between 2018-2020 as a participant of NASA’s USIP-2 and CSLI-8 programs.

University of Minnesota

Booth Space: U6

University of Minnesota

Booth Space: U6


Booth Space: U20

University of Southern Indiana

Booth Space: U20


The University of Southern Indiana CubeSat team is currently developing their first CubeSat - UNITE. The Undergraduate Nano Ionospheric Temperature Explorer&#39;s mission will be to take space weather measurements in the lower ionosphere. Funded through NASA&#39;s Undergraduate Student Instrument project, UNITE is expected to reach orbit in mid to late 2018.

Booth Space: U8

The University of Tokyo has been a pioneer of nano-/micro-satellites development for over 10 years. Starting from the world&#39;s first CubeSat &#34;XI-IV&#34; launched in 2003, we have successfully launched five nano-/micro-satellites. Based on these achievements, we have started working on nano-/micro-satellites for deep space exploration. The first interplanetary micro-satellite &#34;PROCYON&#34; was successfully launched in December 2014, and it has achieved the world&#39;s first demonstration of 50kg-class deep space exploration bus system including deep space communication system and miniature electric &amp; chemical propulsion system. After the success of PROCYON, we proposed and started the development of a 6U CubeSat &#34;EQUULEUS&#34; flying to Earth-Moon Lagrange point, which was selected as one of thirteen CubeSats to be launched by NASA SLS EM-1 in 2018. Our booth will introduce the details and latest status of &#34;EQUULEUS&#34; and our past missions with their on-orbit achievements.

Booth Space: U21

Utah State University

Booth Space: U21
Jack Kiefer
jack.c.kiefer@gmail.com
http://physics.usu.edu

.USU’s “Get Away Special (GAS)” Microgravity Research Team is a primarily undergraduate team of students formed in 1982 in conjunction with NASA’s Small Self-Contained Payloads program. Since then, the GAS team has been responsible for keeping USU’s reputation of having sent more student experiments into space than any other university in the world. This booth showcases two current projects of the GAS team: an inflatable &#34;aeroboom&#34; for passive CubeSat attitude control, and an open-source embedded CubeSat software system known as Cubium. The aim of Cubium is to provide open access to space-grade embedded software that is geared towards users with an undergraduate level of knowledge and background.

Booth Space: U15

Western Michigan University

Booth Space: U15


http://rsowali.wixsite.com/wali-kzoo

The Western Aerospace Launch Initiative (WALI) is a student organization at Western Michigan University, with the goal of designing and manufacturing a small satellite for space flight. Designing a satellite is a multi-disciplinary task and we encourage and recruit students of all majors to join us in this challenge. We are members of the University Nanosatellite Program, Round 9.<br> The plasma spectroscopy (P-Spec) mission is our UNP mission.&nbsp; The P-Spec mission will determine the viability of on-orbit inter-satellite plasma plume diagnostics of an electric propulsion (EP) thruster while demonstrating several technologies. These technologies include: 1. EP thruster component and feed system integration with a CubeSat platform; 2. Inter-Satellite communication; 3. Using a mother-daughter configuration to take on orbit plasma diagnostics. The success of this mission will help the aerospace community to diagnose problems with and improve EP thrusters in future missions.